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The public sector in direst need of reform is ...

Displaying poll results.
Education
  4408 votes / 32%
Healthcare
  3135 votes / 23%
Law Enforcement / Corrections
  1757 votes / 12%
Infrastructure / Public Works
  963 votes / 7%
Science / Space R&D
  912 votes / 6%
Military
  1199 votes / 8%
Environment
  491 votes / 3%
Other, explained below
  691 votes / 5%
13556 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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The public sector in direst need of reform is ...

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  • by billstewart (78916) on Tuesday May 07, 2013 @11:20PM (#43661615) Journal

    It's not like law enforcement and the prison business aren't also in drastic need of reform; there's no excuse for the US to have more people in jail than the Soviet Union did. But all the world's militaries are making their own countries worse for their own people, making them worse for their enemies, forcing their neighbors to beef up their militaries, and the US and Russia are still threatening to blow up the world with nuclear weapons. Militaries are an excuse for governments to have power over their own people, and to give lucrative contracts to their politically connected friends, and defense contractors are happy to contribute to whatever politicians will give them the most business, regardless of how bad they are on other topics.

    There are a few countries out there without armies. Costa Rica got rid of theirs back in the 1800s, not because they're any more peace-loving than everybody else, but because their president realized that the primary functions of a Latin American military were to steal land from the Indians (already done!) and to overthrow the civilian president (which he didn't want to happen to him.) Most of the others are countries in civil war, where there's no single official army.

  • I know there are only twelve votes right now, so I hope "Education" is just an outlier in this poll at the moment.
    If you think Education is in need of reform, you need to check out the NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress).
    It is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas,
    and it confirms what evidence based educators already know: we have been making slow and steady progress, year after year. Never
    have we "g

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @04:33AM (#43663007)

      I voted based on my own country's need for education reform, not the US's. The polls really should be either more specific, or less US-specific.

      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        Exactly. How you voted depends very much on where you live. I'm from Canada, and I kind of had a hard time determining which one to choose. There's a lot of griping about our healthcare but personally I think we do pretty well. Our education system seems to work pretty well. Law enforcement and corrections has some problems but seems to be not completely insane as in other countries. In the end, I chose infrastructure/ Public Works. I think the major problem with a lot of infrastructure (at least as it di
    • by Anonymous Coward

      When schools in Tennessee and the Bible belt still teach that man and dinosuars coexisted, that the great flood killed the dinosaurs, that the earth is six thousand years old, and use religious texts as legitimate education tools, education needs some looking in to...

    • by c0lo (1497653)

      NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress)

      *Assessment: a.k.a. "tell me how you measure me and I'll tell you how I'll behave" (a.k.a. learning not for the knowledge/skills/thinking but to pass the exams and get that damn-piece-of-paper-the-dumb-HR/recruiters-keep-so-dear-but-useless-in-any-other-way-especially-as-toilet-paper).
      * Couple this with "No kids left behind" - a.k.a. "no kid allowed to get ahead" [slashdot.org] (see the reference to the need to "dumb-down their instruction").

      If you get over the semantic of Reform == "bipartisan deal between the elites

    • by nbauman (624611) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @04:38AM (#43672893) Homepage Journal

      Yes, it's worth spending some time on the NAEP web site looking over the data. That is, if you like data, rather than fads and buzzwords.

      They've been testing since about 1972, as I recall. During that time, the results have been on a remarkably level curve, with a slight upward trend.

      One of the most striking trends is that the achievement of hispanic and especially black students has been going up dramatically, although it doesn't show up in the overall trend curves. So maybe all that affirmative action had some effect. Too bad we're going back to segregation again.

      Another interesting thing about the NAEP web site is their comparison of charter schools with public schools. The NAEP is one of the few testing organizations that has statistically and scientifically valid results. They found that charter schools were worse overall than public schools, although a few charter schools were better. (That's when you pick the charter schools that can be validly compared, not the ones that select their students, kick out the problem kids, and have gobs of money from right-wing foundations.)

      If you know this much, you probably know about Diane Ravitch, who was assistant secretary of education under both GHW Bush and Bill Clinton. Ravitch said that she started out believing that the solution was charter schools, privatization, high-stakes testing, and getting rid of the unions. But when she looked at the data, all those trendy conservative solutions weren't working. That's the difference between a scientist and an ideologue. A scientist admits it when she's wrong. An ideologue just gets more data to cherry-pick.

      Ravitch said that the one factor that most strongly affects educational achievement is family income. So you can throw out all these studies that don't correct for family income.

      If you want kids to succeed in school, you have to eliminate poverty, which was one of our national goals from about the time of FDR to GHW Bush. That all ended with Bill Clinton, and his End Welfare as we Know It sellout (Google "Peter Edelman"). So it's not a Democratic/Republican issue. Gee, funny thing, when politicians have to pander to billionaires and corporations in order to get money for their attack ads every election, the Democrats and Republicans both turn into scumbags.

      Maybe the great American education system of the second half of the 20th century was an anomaly. We won WWII in large part by science and technology, so after the war boosting science and technology education was actually patriotic. We were competing with the Soviets, who had one of the best education systems in the world, particularly in science. Now there's no public sentiment in the US for broad education any more. Those corporations don't need to put American kids through college. They can hire cheaper employees from abroad.

      Right now, the best way for a non-wealthy kid to get an education is to join the military. What does that tell you about America?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 07, 2013 @11:26PM (#43661659)
    I think all of those are covered pretty well, actually. Oh wait, you're talking about the U.S., aren't you? lol, good luck with that.
  • No contest, surely. (Score:2, Informative)

    by real-modo (1460457)

    Health. The USA gets worse outcomes with twice the GDP expenditure of any other OECD country.

    • by OzPeter (195038) on Tuesday May 07, 2013 @11:55PM (#43661841)

      Health. The USA gets worse outcomes with twice the GDP expenditure of any other OECD country.

      Yeah .. but without education how will the locals know how misplaced is their belief that the US is the best country in the world?

    • by rgmoore (133276) <glandauer@charter.net> on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @01:13AM (#43662223) Homepage

      But the problems with our health spending are not primarily in the public sector. Those other countries that have more efficient healthcare than we do have more of their healthcare run by the government, and there's a fairly strong correlation between cost effectiveness and government control. Within the US, the the government is generally more cost effective than the private sector. Within the government sector, the most efficient provider is the VA, which runs its own hospitals rather than just being a glorified insurance company. There's every reason to think that our healthcare system would be improved by turning more of it over to the government.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by danbert8 (1024253)

        I'm sorry, can you please give an example where the government is more cost effective than the private sector? I sure can't think of one. If the government is so much more cost effective than the private sector then their profit margins must be ridiculously high! Oh wait, they're in debt up to our eyeballs...

        Private education is cheaper and more effective than public education.
        Private charity is more effective with less funds than public handouts.
        UPS and FedEx are cheaper and faster (for comparable services

        • by Geoffrey.landis (926948) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @09:16AM (#43664235) Homepage

          But the problems with our health spending are not primarily in the public sector. Those other countries that have more efficient healthcare than we do have more of their healthcare run by the government, and there's a fairly strong correlation between cost effectiveness and government control. Within the US, the the government is generally more cost effective than the private sector. Within the government sector, the most efficient provider is the VA, which runs its own hospitals rather than just being a glorified insurance company. There's every reason to think that our healthcare system would be improved by turning more of it over to the government.

          I'm sorry, can you please give an example where the government is more cost effective than the private sector?

          Sure: health care,

          Uh, didn't you actually read the post you are responding to?

        • by Newander (255463) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @09:37AM (#43664409)

          Not sure about the other two examples, but you can't ship anything using UPS or FedEx for $0.44. In fact the USPS is so efficient that both FedEx and UPS use it for last mile service in many cases.

          • Not sure about the other two examples, but you can't ship anything using UPS or FedEx for $0.44. In fact the USPS is so efficient that both FedEx and UPS use it for last mile service in many cases.

            Actually, you can't send a letter with USPS for $0.44 either -- rate is now $0.46. But your point still stands even with the extra 2 pennies.

          • Not sure about the other two examples, but you can't ship anything using UPS or FedEx for $0.44.

            Of course, it's ILLEGAL for UPS or FedEx to deliver First Class Mail, which is the only thing the USPS will deliver for $0.44 (or whatever it it these days - I'm still using Forever stamps from years ago too).

            And anything that both UPS/FedEx and the USPS can both legally deliver, UPS and FedEx do cheaper.

          • The price to the consumer is not the same as the total cost. It likely costs the USPS roughly the same amount to deliver a package as it does UPS, FedEx, DHL, etc. That you pay a lot less than that is not a marker of efficiency; on the contrary, it is a marker of the distortions in price as a consequence of Congress meddling with the USPS, which is supposedly a "private" company. Moreover, the USPS should be charging the other carriers for that last-mile delivery; if they're not charging what it costs to

        • I'm sorry . . .

          UPS and FedEx are cheaper and faster (for comparable services) than the USPS.

          Actually, I suppose it is I who should apologize -- if an apology is the proper way to introduce a contrary view. When shipping a document last week I found USPS to be the best option whether I needed overnight delivery or just a simple delivery/signature confirmation. Priority mail flat-rate packages also frequently beat UPS and FedEx for smallish stuff -- particularly if it's dense. You should comparison-shop.

        • by wirelessjb (806759) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @03:04PM (#43667609)

          I'm sorry, can you please give an example where the government is more cost effective than the private sector? I sure can't think of one. If the government is so much more cost effective than the private sector then their profit margins must be ridiculously high! Oh wait, they're in debt up to our eyeballs...

          Private education is cheaper and more effective than public education. Private charity is more effective with less funds than public handouts. UPS and FedEx are cheaper and faster (for comparable services) than the USPS. Need I go on?

          I keep typing and erasing replies to this, knowing that my points won't hit home. As long as there are a lot of voters that believe that there is no place for government in providing services and investing in the future, things are not going to get better. The other fallacies in the quotation above are equally dismaying; the government doesn't provide services with a profit motive. Government debt is not inherently a bad thing (anyone who compares public debt to a credit card is ill informed). Public education and other services do not threaten private education or private donations, but believing that they are mutually exclusive is a red herring and dangerous. I'm in the USA, but I don't think these ideas are uniquely applicable to my country.

          • by Zordak (123132) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @05:54PM (#43669407) Homepage Journal

            Government debt is not inherently a bad thing (anyone who compares public debt to a credit card is ill informed).

            Because we can just print more money to pay it off. Why, we can even mint 15 $1T coins and deposit them with the treasury, and Wham! There goes our debt. And fortunately, that has absolutely no effect on the value of the dollar, or the dollar's position as the international standard currency. And if there's one thing history teaches us, it's that no regime has ever fallen because it spent itself into mountainous debt that it was unable to crawl back out of.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by wirelessjb (806759)
              A government without debt is a government that isn't investing in its future. Government debt is money that the public is borrowing from *themselves*. So it's not like an underwater mortgage, or a credit card. As long as a government balances its debt with the rate of inflation (which in the US, despite repeated cries of doom, has been at historic lows for a long time), the debt can serve to help drive the economy. If the inflation rate stays low, that means that creditors believe that the government is bei
      • by kbolino (920292)

        There are two factors you are ignoring in proclaiming the greatness of government-run health facilities:

        1. Quality. The military healthcare system is notorious for its terrible (or, at the very least, wildly inconsistent) quality of service and outcomes.

        2. Confounding variables. There are examples of facilities (e.g. in India) which are not state-run yet achieve decent outcomes at much more reasonable prices.

    • by agm (467017)

      I'm assuming this poll is about the country the respondent is in and not necessarily the USA.

      I think the state exists to protect people from the initiation of force. For them to do that they must first stop harming us. This means stop confiscating wealth from us, which means they will need to stop spending money on education, health etc. and insteads leave that up to individual communities via voluntary means.

  • by EzInKy (115248) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @12:20AM (#43661989)

    All the other options depend on reliable transportation, communication, and power to operate effectively.

    • Our transportation, communication, and power function 'well enough' for everything else to operate effectively already. Not to say they are perfect or good or even decent, just that you can have good education and research, good healthcare, a fair justice system, a reasonably sized military, and address environmental concerns with the infrastructure we have today.

      • Problem is, they aren't future-proof.
        What about peak-oil?
        That should be addressed by the public sector, because the private one only cares about the next quarter.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Education might win this if people think like I did: Educate people, and all the other problems get solved.

    Note, education doesn't just mean dumping facts into brains. It means instilling integrity, which is the hard part.

    I don't see it happening. It's possible to prune the branches of this ugly tree, but truly good education would axe the problems at the root.

    Now, this is my opinion and I know it's controversial; but tell the unions to pound sand. Tenure? Bite me. Complex rules for teacher evaluation

    • Note, education doesn't just mean dumping facts into brains.

      But that's all our public schools are good for in the US! How else are we going to train a nation of Jeopardy! players?

  • law enforcement (Score:4, Insightful)

    by JimboFBX (1097277) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @02:51AM (#43662649)

    Law enforcement and the justice system needs an overhaul. Long delays for trials, a system where you must show up in person to defend trivial offenses or even ENTER YOUR PLEA, even if you don't live in the same state, one where your own state won't help defend you but they'll help arrest you for outstanding warrants or FTAs. That's a system where it can be more expensive to defend your innocence than to falsely admit guilt. One where you can call up a clerk and they literally won't give any assistance at all because "they aren't allowed to give legal advice". A system so complex and full of contradictions you need a degree to understand it, and even then a lot of it is up to interpretation. A system where laws are intentionally set against social norms (speed limit) or are ridiculously outdated with the only purpose to rob people for the purpose of filling coffers (speed cameras in a school zone near a high school).

    The definition of highway robbery now means I got pulled over for doing something trivial that people violate on a daily basis (such as speeding when the flow of traffic is over the speed limit) and given a completely unfair and expensive ticket ($115 for 1 mph over the speed limit), rather than being robbed by actual criminals.

  • Military and law enforcement reform need to come first because there are not only harmful but unbelievably wasteful programs there (the various Wars on Abstract Concepts at home and abroad, e.g. Terror and Drugs) which, when trimmed, would free up the money needed to properly reform the rest. Military and law enforcement are the first priorities of a government, the first things you need to have in place to have a government at all, but once those functions are handled satisfactorily, any excess going into

  • by ctrl-alt-canc (977108) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @04:25AM (#43662969)
    Slashdot polls are more accurate.
  • Being from Norway, where things are a bit different than eg. the US, I chose from the "most likely to kill us"-list; that being the Environment.

  • by wickerprints (1094741) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @05:20AM (#43663207)

    Education is the only option in the list which, if addressed properly, would lead to resolution or improvement of ALL the other options. How?

    Educational level correlates with better awareness of one's health. If kids are taught from a young age to eat well in school (rather than left by the parents to just sit in front of the indoctrination box called the TV, watching endless advertisements for snacks and candy and fast food), we wouldn't be having an obesity and diabetes epidemic. Revitalize the school lunch programs, bring back mandatory physical education, and health education. Furthermore, educational level is a predictor of adult income levels, and the higher your income, the less you are forced to eat cheap processed fast foods as your main source of nutrition.

    Education reduces crime and poverty rates, leading to less need for law enforcement, jails, and alleviates the overburdened court system. It also equalizes access to the legal system, which has become exorbitantly costly.

    Education creates the engineers who build public works and infrastructure. With better education comes increased income and tax revenue, resulting in more monies to pay for such projects.

    Education creates the scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and technologists who run the space program, but education among ALL citizens more crucially increases AWARENESS of the importance of the role of such people in building the economy for future generations. Even if you don't go into a STEM career, having more than a GED-level education will show you the value of such positions in society.

    Education reduces the need for large military forces. Smarter people don't fight wars because they don't GET into wars. Wars are fought because the people who have a political and/or financial interest to create conflict and profit off it, incite war through strategic foreign policy decisions. They manipulate and foment paranoia and fear in the public, in order to achieve their goals. Afghanistan and Iraq are the product of decades of foreign policy masterminded by Big Oil, using various excuses such as anti-communism and anti-terrorism, to justify spilling blood for their own profit. If people were better educated, they would be less susceptible to believing the lies that their government feeds them.

    Education brings about scientific literacy and critical thinking skills, again allowing people to resist propaganda from climate change deniers (who are, like the military example above, shills from big business interests who are solely focused on short-term profit and are happy to destroy the environment for centuries to come as long as it makes them rich in their lifetime). If you lack those critical thinking skills, you won't know how to formulate questions about the world around you in a scientific and objective manner, and you won't be able to understand why scientific reasoning is fundamentally superior to religious, dogmatic, or ideological reasoning.

    The only reason why we have so many problems in this world is because too many people are too damn stupid to know they are being manipulated by those who are in power. And the reason they are stupid is because they are KEPT that way by those in power. The LAST thing the government wants to do is make its citizens smart enough to question its motives and hold them and their campaign backers accountable. All they need from the people is to make them smart enough to turn on their TVs to watch Fox News, and know how to tap a touchscreen voting machine--and that's only until they figure out a way to eliminate the need for them to vote at all.

    • by ltrand (933535)
      I find this interesting given that fewer people had college education at the height of NASA, building of the national infrastructure, or the creation of this country than we have now. Yet you don't hear many politicians talking about principle core reasoning like they did when we founded this country, instead we have "beliefs". We could build highways across the whole country when high school was "good enough". How many senior managers started their "entry level" professional positions without bachelors
    • by dkleinsc (563838)

      I agree that education is a critical issue. I disagree that it's in the direst need of reform. Our schools aren't perfect by any stretch of the imagination, but they are generally capable of providing a basic education to those that choose to make full use of it.

      With better education comes increased income and tax revenue, resulting in more monies to pay for such projects.

      I have to take issue with this argument. As recent trends have shown, not just in the US but in many other countries, what you can actually get with a highly educated population is not everybody becoming rich, but rather lots of highly educated peop

    • by moeinvt (851793)

      I think you would have a hard time demonstrating that "educated" people are less susceptible to brainwashing and propaganda than uneducated people. At least based on what passes for "education" these days. Maybe a "reformed" education system could actually focus on development of critical thinking and problem solving skills. That's not what we have today however.

      The current government-run system teaches respect and acceptance of authority. Sit in rows, stand in line, move when the bell rings, obey the t

    • by kbolino (920292)

      The problem with your thesis is that it looks at correlation and infers causation. This is the fallacy that has driven "education reform" for decades and continues to drive educational outcomes downward. It is the same fallacy that created the previous housing bubble. Home ownership does not give a person responsibility; it used to take responsibility in order to own home. Likewise, education doesn't cause any of the things you say it does. Unfortunately, the causal relationships are in many cases very

  • by dkleinsc (563838) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @09:06AM (#43664149) Homepage

    On the one hand, the military-industrial complex is bankrupting the country, spending staggering amounts of money on planes that have never been used and brand new tanks that the Army doesn't even want. For some reason, people who are adamantly opposed to domestic pork have no problems with military pork.

    On the other hand, law enforcement problems mean that small-fry potheads are in some cases going to prison for life while the bankers who launder $2 billion of drug money and aid arms deals with Iran get what amounts to no punishment whatsoever. For some other reason, people who advocate law and order have no problems with massive crime if it's committed by their friends.

  • by DarthVain (724186) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @10:00AM (#43664627)

    I voted education, but then again I live in Canada. Since this is a mostly US centric site I sort of assumed that Healthcare would win out as something obvious.

    Then again perhaps education is just messed up everywhere.

    I guess I could see voting education in the US with all the weirdo divergent curriculum with a 5000 year old bearded zombie Jesus riding a velociraptor to defeat the gay abortionists or whatever...

    From a Canadian perspective, sort of the same thing, but much less so. It still has to do with religion and education, but it is more about the administration VS the actual curriculum I think. Where I live there are TWO boards of education that run in parallel, a "public" system and a "Catholic" system, which is also public in every sense of the word, only that everything about it is based on Catholic beliefs. The reason it exists is of course in the fog of time, and was something established back in the 1800's. Anyway the cost of maintaining two boards is stupid. The fact that public money is going to a subset of the population to a religion is stupid. Everything about it is stupid, and the only reason it still exists is that politicians are afraid if they even talk about it every single Catholic will vote against them and they will lose (it has already happened once). On top of that, the teachers Union is CRAZY. Not only do they have their own rules that exist no where else which are nuts, but just like the Catholics, they seem to threaten strike at the drop of the hat, parents don't want their kids at home, and again have the politicians over a barrel, so they basically give them whatever they want for as long as living memory exists.

    Anyway not saying I have all the answers, but the system is clearly broken, and needs some work. Two things need to happen, both of which will be wildly unpopular politically. 1) Get rid of the Catholic school board, or at the very least give them ZERO public money (at which time the problem will take care of itself), and 2) Do not capitulate to Teacher Union demands. Make them take a hit just like every other Public Service sector (apart of Healthcare which is something else entirely), and if they decide to strike, let them for as long as they want. Loose a year and see how Teachers hold up to Politicians as far a popularity goes. As for the crazy union rules, not much can be done about that, or I don't know enough about it to know. Perhaps expand union powers, to allow another competing Union to be established... (can you even have competing unions? I have no idea.)

    As for Healthcare in Canada, the big this is that it is too expensive, and it getting disproportionally more expensive every year. We cannot support that kind of growth forever. Again it is a very unpopular political fight as the doctors and nurses will all make TV ads about the politicians making you sick and trying to kill you etc... and how they are only there to work selflessly day and night to save your life etc... and we have a lot of old voters, which are easily swayed in this regard. However 6-8% increases year over year, forever will not work. Salaries need to take a hit, simple as that.

    Though in listing what I would consider the two biggest issues we have, it is becoming obvious that the biggest problems we have are the ones that politicians simply do not want to touch with a 10ft pole as they are super unpopular. These are also issues that are not new, they have been around for a very long time, and it isn't like no one knows about them, however historically the same problem, politicians don't want to take any action on these sensitive issues. I guess that is the difference between an actual "leader" and just another "politician" looking for election.

  • Congress (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Linnen (735667) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @10:03AM (#43664641)

    One of the best 'Ha Ha, Seriously' suggestions is that Congress Critter should be required to wear NASCAR-style sponsor stickers whenever in session or speaking in public / on TV

  • By reform, do you mean restructuring or cuts?

  • Without election reform, term limits, and changes to the "perks" (like being exempt from some laws) given to elected officials the rest doesn't matter. We can't reform any of those areas without good people in office, and right now the system is rigged to keep good people out.

  • It gives me some hope that most others also selected education. I didn't even read the rest. Educate people and the rest will follow.
  • We need to move away from robbing one group to heap benefits on another. Instead of people being entreprenurial and industrious we seem to focus our energies on how this group, that group or some other collection of people deserves someone else's money that they have done nothing to earn except become adept at lobbying and/or painting themselves as some kind of victim.

    We have set the bar far too low for taking money from someone who has earned it and giving to someone who has done nothing except cry about how they need it. I have more respect for pick pockets who use their skills to pilfer their victim's money. At least they are honest about their thievery.

    Cheers,
    Dave

  • by Errol backfiring (1280012) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @11:05AM (#43665175) Journal
    The thing that is hindering everything else is our money system. We should have a money system that forbids speculation, and where money is created by a democratic power source for actual value, NOT created out of thin air by some (central) bank. That would save healthcare, the environment, and no recession needs to be "solved" by the military either.
  • Subject says it all...
  • by Archangel Michael (180766) on Wednesday May 08, 2013 @12:27PM (#43665903) Journal

    If the government fixed itself, the other things that the government is in charge of would get fixed. Problem is, too many people "believe" in the political "process", when it clearly hasn't worked.

    Moving the power from Federal, to local would help, rather than the current trend of the other way around.

  • The government's massive 40+ year intervention into the healthcare system has been an unmitigated disaster. Skyrocketing costs leave millions of people unable to afford the most basic services. Quality of results lagging behind the rest of the world. A massive insurance industry which sucks profits out of the system but provides very little in the way of value. Government programs doomed for bankruptcy, etc. etc.

    Government has absolutely ruined the U.S. healthcare system. Time for them to get out and l

    • by nbauman (624611)

      Did it ever occur to you that there is no developed country in the world in which the government has left the health care system to the free market?

      In other words, you can't point to a working model. (Try Switzerland. Make my day.)

      Even Adam Smith said that health care was a proper role of the government. He knew about epidemics.

  • And the election system needs to get a complete cleanup. The current system makes it next to impossible to get anything done unless you have a crapload of money and buy your position in one of the two big parties.

  • The public sector (is) in direst need of reform.
  • It is time to drop this terrible profit-driven heatlhcare model completely in this country. Fewer people get good care every year, and the people at the top who are in charge of denying care get more rewards every year as a result. The profit motive does not lead to good or accessible care; the rest of the world knows this and it is time the US wakes up to that obvious fact.

    Ultimately, this terrible system is part of what keeps the US unemployment rate up. Plenty of people who are looking for work wo
  • the politicians are posing and making it impossible for civil servants to do their jobs.
  • What the USA needs, first and foremost, is STRONG campaign finance reform, following the models found in other first-world nations like Canada. Once you have that, much of the other pieces start to fall into place...
  • See above.

A consultant is a person who borrows your watch, tells you what time it is, pockets the watch, and sends you a bill for it.

 



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