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I'd most rather, of the following, search with:

Displaying poll results.
Lycos
  746 votes / 4%
InfoSeek
  280 votes / 1%
AltaVista
  4939 votes / 28%
WebCrawler
  861 votes / 5%
Ask Jeeves
  1056 votes / 6%
Dogpile
  1829 votes / 10%
Gopher
  1930 votes / 11%
Some other (non-Google, non-Bing) option
  5417 votes / 31%
17058 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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I'd most rather, of the following, search with:

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  • AltaVista? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 29, 2013 @01:44AM (#44140411)

    Because it has been shut down recently?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:02AM (#44140469)

    I submit my queries on Ask Slashdot and rely on the moderators lazyness.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday June 30, 2013 @12:01AM (#44145553)

      I find it useful to post something like "hey, Linux is so stupid, it can't even X", where "X" is something I've been unsuccessfully trying to do.

      I almost always get instantaneous results. The replies not only tell me how much of an idiot I am for not knowing it, but they also include detailed instructions on how to accomplish "X". Much faster than using a search engine.

      • by arth1 (260657) on Sunday June 30, 2013 @11:29AM (#44147515) Homepage Journal

        I find it useful to post something like "hey, Linux is so stupid, it can't even X", where "X" is something I've been unsuccessfully trying to do.

        I almost always get instantaneous results. The replies not only tell me how much of an idiot I am for not knowing it, but they also include detailed instructions on how to accomplish "X". Much faster than using a search engine.
        Reply to This Share

        Linux is so stupid, it can't even get me a date with Emilia Clarke.

  • by mendax (114116) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:25AM (#44140513)

    I am a luddite sometimes. Sometimes doing things the old-fashioned way is faster. I cut my teeth in school doing research in the library using its card catalog before it bought some awful online thing that ran on a PDP 11/45. Mercifully, they replaced it with something far more modern. And there were times when flipping through the cards was faster than using the computer. Then there is wandering through the stacks. Sometimes you don't know what you're looking for until you stumble upon it. If you didn't already know this, books are shelved according to subject. Books on similar or closely-related topics are going to be shelved close to each other.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 29, 2013 @04:50AM (#44140835)

      I am a luddite sometimes. Sometimes doing things the old-fashioned way is faster. I cut my teeth in school doing research in the library using its card catalog before it bought some awful online thing that ran on a PDP 11/45. Mercifully, they replaced it with something far more modern. And there were times when flipping through the cards was faster than using the computer. Then there is wandering through the stacks. Sometimes you don't know what you're looking for until you stumble upon it. If you didn't already know this, books are shelved according to subject. Books on similar or closely-related topics are going to be shelved close to each other.

      If you cut your teeth or gums you obviously were using the cards incorrectly. No wonder they switched to computers...

    • by rwa2 (4391) *

      Heh, yeah, sometimes I feel like a luddite for missing yahoo's old hand-assembled outline directory of the internet.

    • by dpbsmith (263124) on Sunday June 30, 2013 @08:58PM (#44150099) Homepage

      Yes, in the 1960s there was a conference entitled INTREX, for Information Transfer Experiments, that was sort of about library-like computer systems. One of the papers was a thoughtful examination of what it meant to "browse" in a library and how one would build a computerized "browsery." I don't know if any such thing was ever implemented, but it seems like a problem that hasn't been solved.

      All the computer types assume that you want to do a targeted search and know what you are trying to find. All I can say is, I learned so much by going into the stacks to find specific book X and getting distracted by all the interesting books on related topics on the shelves around it.

      • by kermidge (2221646)

        I often found more of what I wanted without knowing I wanted it by not finding what I wanted - in a real library.

        These days searching via Google and the rest is too many times an exercise in frustration. While my search-fu is admittedly weak, I generally got better results up until the past year or two. I very much miss Kartoo and I never minded that it used Flash.

      • by jandrese (485)
        Isn't that Yahoo? You know, the huge catalog of curated links you can browse if you don't just use the search engine?
      • by mendax (114116)

        All the computer types assume that you want to do a targeted search and know what you are trying to find. All I can say is, I learned so much by going into the stacks to find specific book X and getting distracted by all the interesting books on related topics on the shelves around it.

        Yep, yep, yep. And that was the downfall of an ADHD person like me with a voracious curiosity. I found myself finding interesting books on topics unrelated to what I was researching and risked never getting anything done. It's much like that damned Wikipedia. Go to one article to learn about something, then click on a link and find oneself sucked into a completely different area. This curiosity proved to me that in order for me to be content all I need is a supply a food and water, a working toilet, an

  • by bradley13 (1118935) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:30AM (#44140527) Homepage

    Once upon a time, when all search engines pretty much sucked, Metacrawler was the way to go. It still exists, though the hamsters must surely be tired after all these years...

    • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:58AM (#44140595)

      I'm old enough (and have been at UW long enough) to have used Metacrawler back when it was still a University of Washington experimental offering. Later it became my first introduction to the wonderful world of a grant-developed product turning into a commercial windfall for someone - I felt betrayed when the ads and sponsored listings showed up.

      I'm somewhat more inured to that situation now, but it does still bug me.

    • In it's day, Metacrawler was the bomb. I hope the NSA doesn't brand me a terrorist for using that metaphor, but there it is.
    • I was disappointed to see a lack of Metacrawler on this list.
  • Duck Duck Go (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:31AM (#44140529)

    Dogpile isn't a rank and search engine, it's a bunch of them. Anyway Duck Duck Go.

    • by Dins (2538550) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @09:29AM (#44141687)
      I'll second that. I came here to post that.
    • Yep. Use it all the time.
    • Re:Duck Duck Go (Score:5, Interesting)

      by jones_supa (887896) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @05:23PM (#44144175)
      If you care about your privacy, DuckDuckGo is probably the best search engine.
    • so I read this suggestion and tried Duck Duck Go and I dig it

      I'm doing a 'startup' that involves screen printing. I constantly and experimenting with various exposure times and techniques for the screen and for dyeing processes.

      Google goes to 3-5 results of 'tshirtforums.com' boards, which should be the first result. I can see why having multiple results from the same domain would help indicate depth of information to a non-technically proficient user, however for an advanced user I appreciate having just o

    • by arth1 (260657)

      You, a bunch of other posters, and a few moderators have apparently failed to see that this is a list of old search engines.
      DDG would have a rightful place of search engines of the late oughties and early tens, but not the late nineties.

  • Gopher (Score:5, Interesting)

    by FPhlyer (14433) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:36AM (#44140541) Homepage

    Must have been around 1995.
    I was working in Public Affairs for Navy Recruiting and was asked by a local town to take part in a 50th anniversary remembrance of the end of World War II. I used Gopher to find a heart-wrenching first-hand account of the attack on Pearl Harbor written by a former Navy Seaman shortly after the event had taken place. My presentation would be a dramatic reading of that document that I downloaded via Gopher.
    As I took to the podium that night, right after actor Jim Nabors finished singing America the Beautiful, it suddenly dawned on me that in every place where the author of my speech referred to the Japanese, he did so with a racial epithet.
    I began to sweat.
    The hardest part of giving that speech was having to censor the document in real time to say "the Japanese" rather than to use the racial epithet from the original document. My audience was a small town in Alabama so it's quite possible nobody would have minded, but it would have bothered me to this day. How I didn't catch it while I read and practiced the speech is still a mystery to me; probably because it was such a common epithet that it is repeated in most historical documentaries or dramas about the time period that my mind just accepted it uncritically.
    Gopher was a great tool and sometimes I miss the clean and not-heavily formatted text that Gopher delivered as opposed to the media-rich content delivered by http.

    • Re:Gopher (Score:5, Informative)

      by arth1 (260657) on Sunday June 30, 2013 @11:21AM (#44147473) Homepage Journal

      The guy who set up the poll obviously had no idea how gopher works - gopher isn't a search, it's a protocol for server assisted fetch; in many ways equivalent to http. It doesn't belong on the list more than http does.

      Most searches of gopher towns are done through archie or veronica, one of which should have been the choice here instead of gopher.

      But if they have a place, surely ftpsearch.ntnu.no should be there too. It was BIG.

      It's also rather telling that when listing old search engines, HotBot isn't one of the choices, while a lot of less successful but better advertised and provider-specific options are.
      Hotbot was probably the second biggest engine in the mid nineties, used a lot because it was so much faster than Altavista.

      • by wjcofkc (964165)
        When I saw gopher listed out of ignorance, I half expected to see Archie and Veronica... Where of course Veronica was a search engine for gopher and Archie a search engine for FTP. May as well have tossed in WAIS and Jughead too. Slashdot can be dumb sometimes, but making that mistake should require someone to hand over their nerd card.

        And yes, hotbot was awesome! I was late to the google bandwagon as a holdout who just wouldn't give it up.
      • by mcmonkey (96054)

        The guy who set up the poll obviously had no idea how gopher works - gopher isn't a search, it's a protocol for server assisted fetch; in many ways equivalent to http. It doesn't belong on the list more than http does.

        Most searches of gopher towns are done through archie or veronica, one of which should have been the choice here instead of gopher.

        But if they have a place, surely ftpsearch.ntnu.no should be there too. It was BIG.

        It's also rather telling that when listing old search engines, HotBot isn't one of the choices, while a lot of less successful but better advertised and provider-specific options are.
        Hotbot was probably the second biggest engine in the mid nineties, used a lot because it was so much faster than Altavista.

        HotBot was my go to search engine before Google came along. It had the best options for getting pretty specific results. Not sure why it was excluded and Ask Jeeves is an option.

        I also used archie back in the internet days before we had this new fangled world wide web.

        I'll assume those oversights were on purpose. What would a /. poll without some obvious mistake to complain about?

  • Duck Duck Go. (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:37AM (#44140545)

    Duck Duck Go. Unlike most of those other options in the poll, it's new enough to take the last 10 to 15 years of search development or so into account.

    • Another thing I've heard is competent is Exalead:
      http://www.exalead.com/search/ [exalead.com]
      I can't vouch for its output since I haven't really used it, but I heard about in a library science course. This of course means it readily takes many operators (NEAR, for instance), so it should be a good fit for Slashdot.

      On another note: remember when Altavista required you to specify you wanted to +search +for +every +word? Then Google came along and did the same thing by default. Until it stopped. I really liked Google before

    • by arth1 (260657)

      Duck Duck Go. Unlike most of those other options in the poll, it's new enough to take the last 10 to 15 years of search development or so into account.

      How is this +5 informative? You missed the context completely.
      For the obligatory car anology, this is like a poll that lists "Maserati Berlinetta", "Ford Thunderbird" and "Studebaker Starliner", and you say it should have Bugatti Veyron.

      Wrong, wrong, wrong.

  • CNIDR WAIS, that is.

  • by phantomfive (622387) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @04:04AM (#44140717) Journal
    Bing might not have made it higher than some of the others there........
  • by fahrbot-bot (874524) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @05:10AM (#44140889)

    It's how I find my ass - I usually keep him out in the barn...

  • I've got all the URLs I need written on a million post-it notes stuck to my monitor, desk, walls and chair.
  • by qubex (206736) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @05:37AM (#44140949) Homepage

    Because in the late nineties it was rather impressive, and the layout appealed to my WIRED-intoxicated, angsty-cypherpunk teen self.

  • Such a shame... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by StoneyMahoney (1488261) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @09:54AM (#44141803)

    I used to use Altavista almost exclusively until someone on alt.hacker pointed me in the direction of Google about 15 years ago. It's a pity what's happened to all those other web search systems:

    Altavista and Webcrawler are now merely front-ends for Yahoo.
    Dogpile aggregates Yahoo, Google and Yandex.
    Infoseek is no more and Gopher is almost impossible to find.

    So realistically, those poll options boil down to Yahoo, Yandex, Ask and Lycos.

  • "I'd most rather, of the following, search with:"

    Some site that uses English as a language, rather than translated from some other tongue (Yodish?)

    Anyway it depends on what you are searching for - if I was searching for some product I was planning on buying I would go to Amazon since I have a (prime) account there, and they aren't based in this state (so no sales tax)

    • Amazon has the worst search engine of any shopping site I've used. If I'm shopping for tech, I browse through categories on newegg or pricewatch first, even if I end up buying from amazon.

  • by Tea-Bone of Brooklyn (828337) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @10:33AM (#44142005)
    You search Gopherspace with Veronica [wikipedia.org].
    • You search Gopherspace with Veronica [wikipedia.org].

      or Archie, but yeah. I had to go look that up real quick to refresh my memory or I would have posted that sooner.

      Mod parent up, 100% fact and again shows how clueless the /. poll editor(s) are.

    • by manu0601 (2221348)
      And I first used Veronica, Archie and WAIS through e-mail gateways. There are FAQ on the topic [faqs.org], but unfortunately the current version does not talk about WAIS anymore.
      • by telchine (719345)

        Aww man, thanks so much for mentioning that FAQ. That brings back memories. I remember using it back when it was "Doctor Bob's Guide to Offline Internet Access". It helped me out loads when my college blocked port 80 because "people were abusing it"

  • I end up use google maybe one time out of twenty (often for obtuse linux or bsd problems), but for day to day searching it works, has a good privacy policy and an https option.

  • Why aren't Google or Bing in the list of choices? Or was there some false assumption made that all /. members are anti-establishment types?
    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      This are all search engines that had their heydays before Google took over, and well before Bing was even conceived.

      For me it's AltaVista because the rest is from before even my time. And I suspect that accounts for a large part of the /. populous.

  • by edxwelch (600979) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @12:26PM (#44142569)

    I'd rather travel to Brazil by the following options:
    * walking
    * hands and knees
    * skateboard
    * pogo stick
    * Space hopper
    * Some other non-airplane option

    • I'd rather beat:
      - a pillow
      - a punching bag
      - a rug
      - an egg
      - a /. poll editor
      - some other inanimate object not listed here

  • Jeeves just because that's what I used back in high school (back when most people I knew thought you had to write your search in the form of a question).

  • Symbol Hound (Score:4, Informative)

    by reve_etrange (2377702) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @02:41PM (#44143309)
    Nothing beats Symbol Hound [symbolhound.com] for code, error messages or anything else with specific symbol arrangements.
  • by thereitis (2355426) on Saturday June 29, 2013 @03:02PM (#44143477) Journal
    Results are just as good, and they respect your privacy.
  • Alt answer: (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Ask CowboyNeal

  • Webcrawler uses Google and Yahoo these days. Way back in the mid-1990s Webcrawler was the search engine I used the most but that ended when Google took over the internet.

  • That was a pretty good search engine a while back.

  • I'd like to use the secret monster search engine the NSA and others share... instead of the lame censored results from Google, Bing, et al.

    What the heck is Red Mercury, for example? Is it something real, or disinformation, etc.

    Set the time parameters to 1963, and see what really happened in Dallas, etc...

    All these results and more with the NSA/CIA/DIA/NRO/MI5/MI6/Mossad Database to rule them all.... Operation Overlord. ;-)

    PS: Please, please don't kill me if I happened to get lucky and guess some classifie

    • by Dusty101 (765661)

      What the heck is Red Mercury, for example?

      It sounds like a sci-fi novel from around 1952...

  • What's wrong with Google again, that isn't wrong with every single other option listed?

    If anyone says "privacy," and the recommends any search provider based in the US, UK, or Europe... they're getting smacked with a fish. I don't know how. I don't know when. But I will find a way.

  • by bobstreo (1320787) on Sunday June 30, 2013 @04:45AM (#44146275)

    I've used Clusty/Yippy http://clusty.com/ [clusty.com] for years. I like the aggregation on the left side.

  • if you value your privacy, but prefer google's search results to duck duck go's, then startpage will anonymise and encrypt your searches, send them to google, and return the results. Fsck the NSA!
  • I found AlltheWeb.com [wikipedia.org] to be the best search engine before the rise of Google. Sadly, they seem to have been acquired by Yahoo and folded into the Borg of Futility.

  • Can I Google that?
  • by hackertourist (2202674) <<ln.tensmx> <ta> <tsiruotrekcah>> on Sunday June 30, 2013 @02:53PM (#44148511)

    for giving an exact search by default, and not hiding it behind a 'verbatim' button 2 menus deep. Also for not trying to get their grubby hands on all of my private data via dubious 'cloud' offerings.

  • I remember that search engine was da shit before Google came along.

  • Hotbot - at the time, it was the one one could configure the most to try and tune the search. it grew up within Lycos and at the times of the first dot com buble also had a webmail aggregate, and other services.

  • I remember when AltaVista was the best search engine before google started.
    It was quick and did have quite a lot of results, but that was in the day when a search term returned a limited number of pages and you could technically reach the end of the search results.
    Ahhh... Information overload. Love it.

  • Wolfram Alpha (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    The forgotten Tech Search Engine for STEM research.

    http://www.wolframalpha.com/

  • ...obviously.

    I've been using Duck Duck Go since before it was paranoid to do so.
  • by Neil Boekend (1854906) on Monday July 01, 2013 @08:08AM (#44152461)
    I simply have a script that greps through all possible websites for what I need. Takes a while on my 14k4 though.
  • It's my second-favorite search engine, after Google. Think of it like dmoz,or like Yahoo used to be: A collection of links found by real people.

    All those things people prefer are suggested to search in those Bing ads, I'd rather search with Wikipedia. Like "honeybee".

  • by Bill_the_Engineer (772575) on Monday July 01, 2013 @04:51PM (#44158923)
    I remember the days when Excite was taking over search. Google came along and offered faster searching without all those distracting ads. Next thing you know people are saying "Excite who?"
  • I don't even remember why I used it, but I assume it was because everything else sucked. I remember hearing about google for the first time from a guest speaker in a computer science lecture, and now everything before that is just kind of a blur.
  • A cleaned up Google, circa 2002/4ish. Sometime before the SEOs and algorithmic tweakings largely destroyed its utility for me.

It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876

 



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